Q1. What is PROVIEW® Focus-Optics (Eye-Training-Optics)?

Q2. How can the same PROVIEW® Focus-Optics work for anyone?

Q3. How does PROVIEW® Focus-Optics work?

Q4. Who does PROVIEW® Focus-Optics work for?

Q5. How long has PROVIEW® Focus-Optics been around?

Q6. Why has it taken so long for this technology to reach the public?

Q7. How is PROVIEW® Focus-Optics different from regular eyeglasses?

Q8. Can PROVIEW® Focus-Optics really let you see as clearly as eyeglasses do?

Q9. Who should use PROVIEW® Focus-Optics?

Q10. How should PROVIEW® Focus-Optics be used?

Q11. Are there times when PROVIEW® Focus-Optics should not be used?

Q12. Is PROVIEW® Focus-Optics something like sunglasses?

Q13. How can PROVIEW® Focus-Optics eliminate eye strain?

Q14. Is it true that PROVIEW® Focus-Optics can "restore" a person's eyesight?

Q15. How distracting are the little holes?

Q16. Can PROVIEW® Focus-Optics replace eyeglasses?

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Q1. What is PROVIEW® Focus-Optics (Eye-Training-Optics)?

    Consist of special alloy frames with black multi-material Nylon lenses punched by laser with several rows of tiny holes (pinholes) with different angles in a prescribed configuration. Outside diameters are the same but inside diameters of each hole are different. The placement of the holes is such to improve eyesight problems by turning blurry images into focused ones so fast for nearly anyone with blurry vision, whether nearsighted, farsighted, or astigmatic. <Top>

Q2. How can the same set of PROVIEW® Focus-Optics work for anyone?

    The same set of Focus-Optics corrects blurry vision for anyone because it works by directing light rays onto the retina at the back of the eye and not through the use of an artificial lens. The pinhole principle has the same effect on every eye, regardless of the type or degree of vision correction required. <Top>

Q3. How does PROVIEW® Focus-Optics work?

    For a person to see images clearly, the light rays entering the eye must come to a focus on the retina at the back of the eye. People who have blurry vision, for whatever reason, cannot see images clearly because the light rays entering the eye focus either in front of the retina or behind it. The Focus-Optics work by letting into the eye only the rays which pass through the center portion of the pupil, blocking out all the rest. It produces a slightly darker image, but all of the light rays entering the eye focus directly on the retina. There is no blur, just a clear, focused image. To most people, it seems like magic. <Top>

Q4. Who does PROVIEW® Focus-Optics work for?

    Almost anyone who has blurry vision can see clearly with the Focus-Optics.  They work for people who suffer from eye strain, nearsightedness, farsightedness, cataracts, astigmatism, and even for people who have farsightedness associated with middle-age (presbyopia). They do not work well for people who suffer from visual defects greater than 6 diopters, and they are not useful for people who suffer from glaucoma or macular degeneration, since these conditions are caused by damaged optic nerves. <Top>

Q5. How long has PROVIEW® Focus-Optics been around?

    The technology is not new, although the name " PROVIEW® Focus-Optics " was coined by Proview Optical Group in 1969. The devices were first conceived by a scientist named Scheiner in 1573, and the U. S. Patent Office awarded Patent No. 1,959,915 for "lensless spectacles" to a Charles C. Guthie of Pittsburgh, PA on May 22, 1934. Since 1934 the devices have been known as "pinhole glasses."  <Top>  

 Q6. Why has it taken so long for this technology to reach the public?

    Pinhole glasses have been around since 1934, but they never became popular for 3 main reasons: 1) flimsy appearance; 2) unsubstantial claims made by vendors, causing those operations to be closed down by the FDA, and 3) fierce opposition from the optical industry, which stands to lose billions from the popularity of pinhole glasses. Half of the glasses they sell can be replaced by pinhole glasses. <Top>

 Q7. How is PROVIEW® Focus-Optics different from regular eyeglasses?

    The primary difference between the two is that Focus-Optics is a natural form of vision correction and eyeglasses correct blurry vision artificially. Focus-Optics can never harm one's eyesight while prescription lenses can cause one's eyesight to weaken over time. Wearing eyeglasses or contacts with illuminated screens such as computer monitors causes headaches and sore eyes, while a person can use Focus-Optics for hours on end without experiencing eye strain. The only advantage that prescription glasses have over Focus-Optics is that they can be used at all times, while Focus-Optics can't be used in dark places and are not recommended for use while driving due to the reduced peripheral vision they cause. <Top>

 Q8. Can PROVIEW®Focus-Optics really let you see as clearly as eyeglasses do?

    Absolutely. We all have been brainwashed by the optical industry into believing that people with blurry vision can see clearly again only with the use of ground glass lenses prescribed by an eye doctor.  That is not true.  Even people who have worn glasses or contacts for years can see images clearly with a set of Focus-Optics. <Top>

 Q9. Who should use PROVIEW® Focus-Optics?

    They can be used by anyone who has blurry vision, young or old, who require visual correction between plus or minus 6 diopters. There is no upper or lower age limit for wearing the Focus-Optics since they are perfectly safe. They can be worn by small school children who develop myopia (nearsightedness) due to excessive reading or by people in their 40s or older who have presbyopia, the farsightedness which develops with middle age. <Top> 

Q10. How should PROVIEW® Focus-Optics be used?

    The most common uses for Focus-Optics are:

Q11. Are there times when PROVIEW® Focus-Optics should not be used?

    Yes. Because of the reduced peripheral vision (side vision) that is caused by the dark lenses, Focus-Optics is best used when seated or when standing still.  They are not recommended to be used when operating a motor vehicle. <Top>

Q12. Is PROVIEW® Focus-Optics something like sunglasses?

    Not really. Although they resemble sunglasses, Focus-Optics works like eyeglasses. Focus-Optics provides no light reduction because the wearer is looking through open pinholes, not a tinted lens. <Top>

Q13. How can Focus-Optics eliminate eye strain?

    The Focus-Optics works by reducing the amount of light entering the eye.  Too much light coming into the eye is what causes eye strain. <Top>

Q14. Is it true that PROVIEW® Focus-Optics can "restore" a person's eyesight?

    Although many vendors of pinhole glasses have claimed that wearing the devices a few minutes a day will restore one's blurry vision to normal, no research has ever been conducted to prove this to be true. On the other hand, many users insist that their vision improved substantially due to their regular use of the Focus-Optics. What has been established is that regular use of the Focus-Optics will preserve a person's eyesight intact and prevent further deterioration from taking place. <Top>  

Q15. How distracting are the little holes?

    Looking through rows of pinholes is obviously not the same as looking through a clear glass lens, but for most people, the benefits of using the Focus-Optics far outweigh the inconvenience of having to look through the little holes. After a short period of adjustment, rather than seeing actual holes in front of your eyes, it is very similar to looking through a black veil. Particularly when used with an illuminated screen such as a computer monitor or TV screen, the "veil" is hardly noticeable after a couple of minutes. <Top>

Q16. Can PROVIEW® Focus-Optics replace eyeglasses?

    Yes and no. It all depends on the nature of your vision problem. If you are FARSIGHTED (can't see close up) you can throw away your reading glasses and forget about ever buying another pair. However, if you are NEARSIGHTED and need to use glasses for such tasks as driving, you will still need the glasses when performing those tasks. Pinholes should not be used for driving due to the loss of light and limited peripheral vision that they provide, but you WILL be able to use Focus-Optics when watching TV or movies or when sitting in the back of an auditorium. The more you use the Focus-Optics, the better. Using them exercises your eye muscles, but when you use eyeglasses your eye muscles relax and get weaker. <Top>

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